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The Parliamentary Procedure Instructional Materials Center (PPIMC) is an official licensee of the National FFA Organization and a resource for teaching materials for the study of Parliamentary Procedure for FFA advisors and members.
The Parliamentary Procedure Instructional Materials Center (PPIMC) is an official licensee of
the National FFA Organization and a resource for
teaching materials for the study of Parliamentary Procedure for FFA advisors and members.

PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE
E-BULLETIN # 54

Volume 14, Number 2 (May, 2014)

This is a FREE quarterly publication (Mid-February, May, August and November) by
Shane D. Dunbar (MEd), Professional Registered Parliamentarian and Professional Accredited Parliamentarian, and Licensed Parliamentarian, that is designed for anyone involved in

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

BPA--DECA--FCCLA--FEA--FFA--HOSA--SkillsUSA--TSA



For comments, or to be placed on the Email list, send your name and Email address to dunbar@northwest.net



Click on "E-Bulletins" on the Main Menu on the left side of this page
for E-Bulletins 1-53.


OUR FOURTEENTH YEAR PRODUCING THIS BULLETIN!

DO IT RIGHT----USE PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE!


"RONR" is the common abbreviation for
Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised

"RONRIB"is the common abbreviation for
Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised In Brief

The standard citation to particular pages and lines is
"RONR (11th ed.[for 'edition']), p.[for 'page'] pp. for 'pages'],
l. [for 'line'], ll. for 'lines']."





A leader in any deliberative assembly should be prepared for any emergency, so that there is no danger of his being tripped up by some expert parliamentarian.

Henry M. Robert, Parliamentary Law, p. 4


APPOINTING SUBCOMMITTEES.

  • A committee can appoint subcommittees.
  • The subcommittees are responsible to the appointing committee.
  • Subcommittee members must be chosen from the members of the committee unless the organization's bylaws provide otherwise.
  • Subcommittees report to the appointing commttee, not the assembly.

    [RONR (11th ed.), p. 497, ll. 14-19]


FREE PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE TEACHING RESOURCES ARE AVAILABLE.

Left click once HERE to view over 33 items that can be downloaded free.


MILLENNIUM FFA HIGH SCHOOL ACCREDITED PARLIAMENTARIANS SERVE

At the National Association of Conservation District Annual meeting, four Millennium high school Accredited Parliamentarians served as floor parliamentarians and SOLO parliamentarians in the regional meetings.

The students were Jeffrey Thimgan, Leah Thimgan, Nicole Piech and Emily Runnion.

Al Gage, Professional Registered Parliamentarian, Professional Accredited Parliamentarian, and Licensed Parliamentarian is their trainer.


EIGHTEEN NEW ACCREDITED PARLIAMENTARIANS

Congratulations to the eighteen members from Dr. Dan Foster's Parliamentary Procedure class from Pennsyvania State University who passed the Accredited Parliamentarian test.

This test for accreditation is available through the Society for Agricultural Education Parliamentarians (www.saep.us).
Left click HERE for details on obtaining the certificate


REGISTER NOW FOR THE NATIONAL 2014 INVITATIONAL NOVICE PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE COMPETITIVE EVENT

The Society for Agricultural Education Parliamentarians (SAEP) and the American Farm Bureau Federation are sponsoring this event for the third time on Tuesday, October 28, 2014 at Louisville. It is open to FFA members who are in the 7th, 8th, or 9th grade at the time of qualification.
The registration deadline is August 1st. Each state is allowed to enter one, seven member FFA team.

Log on to http:www.saep.us and click on "Novice Competitive Event" on the Main Menu for details.


USING THE PRIVILEGED MOTION TO ADJOURN

  • It is always moved in an unqualified form (a time for adjourning or meeting again is stated)
  • It yields to the privileged motion to Fix the Time to Which to Adjourn.
  • It takes precedence over all motions except the privileged motion to Fix the Time to Which to Adjourn.
  • It is not in order while the assembly is voting or verifying a vote.
  • It is not in order before the results of a vote are announced.
  • When a vote is taken by ballot, a motion to Adjourn may be made after the ballots are collected and before the results has been announced.

    [RONR (11th ed.), p. 233, ll. 17-19 and p. 235, ll. 16-24]


CAN A MEMBER SPEAK AGAINST THEIR OWN MOTION?

No. However, a maker can ask permission to withdraw a motion and can also vote against it.

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 393, ll. 19-25]


RECORD NUMBER OF ACCREDITED PARLIAMENTARIANS

The Society for Agricultural Education Parliamentarians (SAEP) now has over 700 Acccredited Parliamentarians (AP's). Most of the AP's are/were high school FFA members. One hundred and fourteen passed the written AP test at the annual National FFA Convention as part of the Parliamentary Procedure Career Development Event.

Candidates must pass a test with a minimum score of 80% in order to qualify for certification. The test consists of locating five quotations from Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised and answering fourty-five multiple choice questions.


ADDRESSING THE CHAIR IF HE/SHE IS THE VICE-PRESIDENT

While presiding, a vice-president is addressed as "Mr/Madam President." However, if the president is also on the platform, a presiding vice-president should be addressed as "Mr./Madam Vice-President."

[RONR (11th ed.), p.23, ll. 5-11]


DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A PARLIAMENTARY INQUIRY AND A POINT OF ORDER

A Parliamentary Inquiry is a question about parliamentary law or the rules of the organization directed to the chair, who then gives an opinion.

A Point of Order is used to call the assemby's attention to a violation of the rules, and the chair makes a decision (a ruling).

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 293, ll. 29-32 and p. 247, ll. 3-7 ]


ABBREVIATIONS

Henry Martyn Robert's books have used many abbreviations.
  • His first book, Rules of Order, which was published in 1876, was abbreviated R.O. (with periods).
  • His 1915 revision for Robert's Rules of Order Revised was abbreviated R.O.R. (with periods).
  • Editions since 1970 for Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised are abbreviated RONR (without periods).


CAN TWO MOTIONS BE PENDING AT THE SAME TIME?

You can have two motions pending at the same time. For example a main motion and many secondary motions (such as amend Commit or Refer, etc.) can be pending simultaneously.

However, two main motions cannot be pending at the same time.

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 59, ll. 31-35]


MAY A MEMBER EXPLAIN HIS/HER VOTE?

No, because explaining would be the same as debating.

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 408, ll. 16-19]


MEANING OF "EXHAUSTED" DEBATE RIGHTS

If a member has debated two times on a particular motion on the same day, his/her right to debate has been exhausted.

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 43, ll. 8-10]


SOME STANDARD DESCRIPTIVE CHARACTERISTICS FOR ORDERS OF THE DAY

1) What is the purpose of a Call for the orders of the Day?
To require that business be taken up in order.

2) What class of motions does it belong to?
Privileged.

3) How can the assembly deny that the orders of the day not be taken up?
Two-thirds of the assembly can vote against bringing it up.

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 219]


MYSTERY MOTIONS (By Tim Wynn,PRP, President, Perfect Rules, Inc. from the National Parliamentarian)

Review the clues to the motions below to identify the mystery motions.

The answers are on the bottom of the page.

  • Mystery Motion 1 (easy) I am used to modify the wording of a pending motion.
  • Mystery Motion 2 (easy) I can be used to create a short intermission in a meeting, but I do not close the meeting.
  • Mystery Motion 3 (intermediate) I am the highest-ranking subsidiary motion, along with being one of the most widely misused.
  • Mystery Motion 4 (intermediate) I can be used to close debate on a pending moton, but I can't impose an immediate closing of debate.
  • Mystery Motion 5 (intermediate) I'm not out of order, but I'm not necessary. If I am made, a vote is never taken on me. And, just to be clear, the chair never rules on me, either.


ANOTHER NAME FOR "POINT OF INFORMATION"

"Request for Information" is the new name for "Point of Information." However, A Request for Information can still be called a "Point of Information."

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 294, ll. 19-20]


DO NOT USE THE HEADING "OLD BUSINESS."

(Jim Slaughterhttp://www.jimslaughter.com)

"An ordinary society proceeds through different headings in the order of business, such as 'Reading and Approval of Minutes.' One heading is often incorrectly referred to as 'Old Business' and refers to questions that have come over from the previous meeting. According to Roberts Rules of Order Newly Revised (11th Edition), what is the correct title for this part of the order of business?"

The answer is on the bottom of the page.


APPEALING THE CHAIR'S ANNOUNCEMENT OF A VOTE

If a member feels that the chair made a mistake in announcing a voice vote, it would not be proper to appeal the chair's announcement. The proper request is to call for a Division of the Assembly.

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 259, ll. 10-15]


MAY THE CHAIR PLACE A MOTION BEFORE THE ASSEMBLY?

In most situations, no. However if members seem to be in favor of a motion, the chair may place a motion before the body without a formal motion. An example would be for the chair to ask, "Is there any objection to approving the minutes?"

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 54, ll. 13-33]


MAY THE CHAIR PLACE A MOTION BEFORE THE ASSEMBLY WITHOUT A SECOND?

Yes. "If the chair is certain that a motion meets with wide approval but members are slow in seconding it, he can state the question without waiting for a second."

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 36, ll. 33-34 and p. 36, l. 1]


IS THE MOTION TO LIMIT OR EXTEND LIMITS OF DEBATE DEBATABLE?

YES-if it is made when a debatable motion is not pending. It is then a main motion.

NO-if it is made when a debatable motion is on the floor. It is a subsidiary motion.

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 12, tinted and p. 14, tinted]


SECONDING MOTIONS WITHIN SMALLER BOARDS

If there is not more than a dozen board members, motions do not need to be seconded.

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 488, ll. 1]


CAN THE CHAIR IGNORE THE PARLIAMENTARIAN'S ADVICE?

YES. "After the parliamentarian has expressed an opinion on a point, the chair has the duty to make the final ruling and, in doing so, has the right to follow the advice of the parliamentarian or disregard it."

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 467, ll. 1-4]


BRAINTEASER

(Jim Slaughterhttp://www.jimslaughter.com)

Under the language of the current edition of Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised, if there are nominations for office from a committee, should there also be a call for nominations from the floor?

The answer is on the bottom of the page.


MOTIONS TO USE FOR SPECIFIC ACTIONS (Advice from Dr. John A. Cagle, Parliamentarian of the Academic Senate and Professor Emeritus of Communication at California State University, Fresno)

  • Present an idea for consideration or action---Main motion or Resolution; Consider subject informally
  • Improve a pending motion---Amend; Division of the question
  • Regulate or cut-off debate---Limit or extend debate; Previous question (vote immediately)
  • Delay a decision---Refer to committee; Postpone definitely ; Postpone indefinitely (kills motion)
  • Suppress a proposal---Object to consideration; Postpone indefinitely; Withdraw a motion
  • Meet an emergency---Question of privilege; Suspend rules; Lay on the table
  • Gain information on a pending motion---Parliamentary inquiry; Request for information; Question of privilege; Request to ask member a question
  • Question the decision of the chair---Point of order; Appeal from decision of chair
  • Enforce rights and privileges---Division of assembly; Division of question; Parliamentary inquiry; Point of order; Appeal from decision of chair
  • Consider a question again---Resume consideration; Reconsider; Rescind
  • Change an action already taken---Reconsider; Rescind; Amend motion previously adopted
  • Terminate a meeting---Adjourn; Recess

CAN THE CHAIR TAKE A COUNTED VOTE WITHOUT THE MEMBERS PERMISSION?

YES. The chair can take a counted vote at his/her own initiative.

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 52, ll. 23-25]


WHAT IS A PLURALITY VOTE?

A plurality vote is the proposal or candidate that receives the most votes when three or more choices are possible.

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 404, ll. 35-36 and p. 405, ll. 1-2]


WHEN CAN THE MOTION TO TAKE FROM TABLE BE MADE?

"This motion is not in order, however, until some business or interrupting matter has been transacted or dealt with since the question was laid on the table;..."
[RONR (11th ed.), p. 301, ll. 8-11]


THE MOTION TO AMEND IS NOT ALWAYS DEBATABLE

An amendment is not debatable if the motion to be amended is not debatable. Two examples of undebatable, amendable motions that can be amended are the privileged motions to Recess and Fix the Time to Which to Adjourn.

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 133, ll. 13-14]


CLOSING DEBATE BY A MEMBER CALLING OUT "QUESTION."

Members may not scream "Question!" without obtaining the floor to close debate. To stop debate, the motion for the Previous Question must be made.

Some of the rules for the Previous Question are:
  • Undebatable
  • Unamendable
  • Must be seconded
  • Cannot interrupt
  • Two-thirds vote required

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 207, ll. 18-20]


SOME MORE CHANGES IN THE NEW EDITION (11th) OF ROBERT'S RULES OF ORDER NEWLY REVISED

  • Clarifies the definition of ex-officio board members who are under the authority of the Society [483].
  • Establishes that the officers of an ordinary society serve as the officers of the board unless the bylaws provide otherwise [484, 577].
  • Clarifies that executive committees operate under the rules related to boards, not committees [485].
  • Establishes that boards and committees may employ procedures to protect themselves against breaches of order [486, 500n, 501].
  • Clarifies that only in a meeting may a board properly transact business [486-87].
  • Recognizes circumstances under which a standing committee may be constituted by a vote of the majority of the entire membership [491].
  • Allows special rules of order to authorize appointment of nonmembers to committees [492].
  • Clarifies the procedure under which, when there are no more nominations for members of a committee than there are places to fill, the nominees are declared elected by unanimous consent [494].
  • States that reasonable notice of committee meetings is to be sent to every committee member [499, 501].
  • States more definitively the applicability to committees of modified, more informal rules of parliamentary procedure unless otherwise instructed by their parent assembly, and clarifies the nature of the rules under which committees operate [500-501].


CHALLENGE QUESTIONS! TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE ABOUT ADJOURNING (From the National Association of Parliamentarians Study Guide)

1) The unqualified motion to Adjourn is
A. A privileged motion.
B. in order when another has the floor.
c. debatable and amendable.
D. in order while the assembly is engaged in voting.

2) Which of the following are in order while the motion to adjourn is
pending?
A. To inform the assembly of business requiring attenton.
B. To make important announcements.
C. To make a motion to reconsider a previous vote.
D. All of the above are correct.

3) An adjournment of a mass meeting:
A. dissolves the assembly, unless a time has been set for another
meeting.
B. is in order at any time during the session.
C. is used only to terminate the session.
D. is never open to debate or amendment.

Answers are on the bottom of the page.


TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE ON VOTING

[From Dunbar's Manual of Parliamentary Procedure Test Questions,an FFA and BPA reference for their competitive event examination phase.

To review the table of contents of the Manual, click HERE


1.The word majority means

A. "exactly half."
B. "less than half."
C. "more than half."
D. 51%

2. If 40 votes are cast, a majority is

A. 20
B. 21
C. 19
D. 18

3. If sixty votes are cast, a minimum two-thirds vote is

A. 30
B. 31
C. 40
D. 41

Answers are on the bottom of the page.


NEW PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE CDE PROBLEM SOLVING MANUAL(CD)

This manual was developed to train students for the new FFA CDE Team Problem Solving Activity. It has 50 short meeting scenarios and problems (questions) arranged in four levels of difficulty.

Students research a problem and write a short solution with reference to specific page and line numbers from the 11th edition of Roberts Rules of Order Newly Revised. Detailed keys are provided which include the exact quote that solves the problem, a short solution for each problem, and their page and line numbers. In addition, there are five multiple-choice tests and a final test with answer keys.

Left click once HERE for details.


PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE GLOSSARY

From Parliamentary Procedure Made Easy,a "best seller" text/workbook.

To review the table of contents, click HERE

Five parliamentary procedure terms will be listed in this glossary for each quarterly E-Bulletin. They are taken from the Best Selling text/workbook, Parliamentary Procedure Made Easy.

  • ADHERE. To be attached to and dependent on. An example would be a pending amendment that is adhered to the motion to which it is applied.
  • ADJOURN. A privileged motion to officially close a meeting. A second is required and a majority vote is required to adopt it. If a time is not set, it is an unqualified adjournment and debate is not allowed even if it is made while no question is pending. It is debatable and amendable if proposed when no motion is pending (as a main motion) with the time for adjournment (qualified). A speaker may not be interrupted to propose this motion.
  • ADJOURNED MEETING. A meeting which is a continuation of a preceding meeting. Sometimes called a "continued meeting."
  • ADJOURN SINE DIE. (Sine die, pronounced SIGN-ee DYE-ee, is a Latin term meaning "without day") Meetings may adjourn "sine die," which means that no date is set for a future meeting.
  • ADOPT. Pass, accept, or agree to by a vote.


BECOME A LICENSED PARLIAMENTARIAN ON LINE

You can be certified as a LICENSED PARLIAMENTARIAN by taking an on-line test covering basic parliamentary procedure concepts offered by the Parliamentarians Licensing Authority.

The timed test consists of two parts:

1) Locating 10 quotes from Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised and listing their page and beginning line numbers.

2) Answering 90 questions taken from a bank of BASIC multiple-choice questions based on the current edition of Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised.

Click HERE for details to become a Licensed Parliamentarian.


____________________________________________________
ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
____________________________________________________

MYSTERY MOTIONS

Mystery Motion 1--Amend; see RONR (11th ed.), p. 130
Mystery Motion 2--Recess; see RONR (11th ed.), p. 230
Mystery Motion 3--Lay on the Table; see RONR (11th ed.), p. 215, l. 10 & tinted page 4
Mystery Motion 4--Limit or Extend Limits of Debate; see RONR (11th ed.), p. 191, ll. 19-27
Mystery Motion 5--A motion to approve the minutes; see RONR (11th ed.), p. 354, ll. 23-24 & p. 355, ll. 5-6


DO NOT USE THE HEADING "OLD BUSINESS."

"Unfinished Business" or "Unfinished Business and General Orders" are now used in the place of "Old business."

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 58, ll. 1-8 and footnote]br>

BRAINTEASER
"After the nominating committee has presented its report and before voting for the different offices takes place, the chair must call for further nominations from the floor."

[RONR (11th ed.), p. 435, ll. 10-12]


CHALLENGE QUESTIONS

1. A
2. D
3. A


TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE ON VOTING

1. C
2. B
3. C


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